Perpetual rediscovery

It was with wry amusement that I read a letter to “The Times” by James Harrison and published in 2003 relating to a “new discovery” about the health of Adolf Hitler, and noting that the conclusion was well-known and previously published. He termed this “perpetual rediscovery”.

During the last week – the first week of 2018 – there have been two responses to an article in the same paper which quoted England’s chief nurse as saying that missed outpatient appointments were a plague, and were costing the National Health Service perhaps as much as £1bn annually.  The subsequent correspondence pointed out that the problem of missed appointments could be resolved very simply – by overbooking.  Thus all slots would be filled, and in the rare event that everyone turned up it would just be rather a busy clinic. In any event, as the NHS did not charge if patients failed to attend, I don’t believe that any money would be lost at all; in fact, because no investigations would be generated, missed appointments might actually save money.

It was a system I used myself.  When managers questioned it, I responded that what was good enough for airlines was good enough for me.  Total rigidity was mad.  Wearing my rehab hat I used to book 45 minute slots for new patients in the multi-disciplinary clinic, because there was always a vast amount of stuff to deal with, including all the physiotherapy, occupational therapy, social work and psychology aspects of long-term severe disability.  A no-show left us all sitting doing not a lot for a long period.  Crazy – not least as for these patients the major cause of a no-show was a transport failure.

I write to “The Times” a lot.  I had four letters published in 2017, taking my total to around 70 which I reckon is a hit rate of about one in eight.  I keep a copy out of vanity.  Thus is was that I was able to recall a previous article about missed appointments, in which it had been suggested that “no-show” patients should effectively be fined (the idea was that a refundable deposit would be forfeited for a non-attendance).  In my response I said:

“…about half of missed appointments are missed because of administrative error – the appointment is sent to the wrong address, for instance… Overbooking ensures the doctor works at full efficiency.”

I annotate all my scanned letters by date, and was thus able to see that I had written this 28 years ago.

Perpetual rediscovery is, in part, a failure of institutional memory.  There is another “perpetual” in the arcane art of outpatient booking – a curious issue which I call the endless loop syndrome. Let’s suppose a patient cancels and the clinic doesn’t know. What happens next is as follows:

  • Let’s say the patient rings to cancel the day before the appointment (January 30th), and is re-booked by central appointments for 5th March
  • The patient doesn’t appear in clinic, so the clinician, not knowing of the cancellation, completes a “did not attend” (DNA) form, which generates another appointment booking through the local clinic desk. However this takes a day to process, so this re-book is for 12th March as the 5th is full
  • Patient receives the letter confirming their own rebooking for 5th March
  • Two days later they receive a second letter generated through the DNA, for 12th March. The letter says “Due to unforeseen circumstances your appointment with Dr Bamji has been changed to the 12th March”
  • The patient thinks this change refers to the appointment they made for the 5th, but this of course remains on the system
  • On 5th March the patient doesn’t appear in clinic, so the clinician completes a DNA form, which generates another appointment booking. However this takes a day to process, and is for 27th April
  • The letter confirming this is received by the patient on the 11th March, and they assume it refers to the appointment the following day, so they don’t turn up
  • On 12th March the patient doesn’t appear in clinic, so the clinician completes a DNA form, which generates another appointment booking. However this takes a day to process, and is for 9th May

And so on ad infinitum, potentially.  Actually it usually stopped after three our four iterations, because the irate patient would ring my secretary to ask what the hell was going on, and she would untangle the mess.

I monitored my DNA rate over several years.  It remained quite steady at between 10 to 15% of new appointments, and slightly less for follow-ups.  If I enquired of one of my “regulars” why they had missed, there was a reasonable excuse 90% of the time; they were ill, a relative was ill, transport had failed to collect them, snow had confined them to the house etc.  Just 10% forgot.  Text message reminders are all very well but, if generated the day before, leave no time for an empty slot to be re-filled.  And occasionally the patient had died so they were unlikely to respond – or their relatives were so devastated, and busy with arrangements, that cancelling an outpatient appointment, if indeed they knew of it, was the last thing on their mind.

So I was amused to read someone else’s solution of overbooking.  Twice.  I wonder if either of them had attended any of my trainee lectures on how to run outpatients – or indeed read my letter from 1989.  I doubt it.  Nihil novi sub sole (Ecclesiastes 1:9).

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